Oct 19, 2013

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What Use Are College Rankings?

We’d be better off without college rankings

Until U.S. News & World Report came out with its first rankings of colleges and universities in 1983, few Americans obsessed over the perceived prestige of the school they attended. Some universities were rather vaguely regarded as superior because they were more selective among applicants and had some famous professors on the faculty, but there was nothing like the frenzy to get into one of them that we see today.

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Oct 17, 2013

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E2 Camp

WP_20130813_12_11_47_Panorama

Had great time meeting new students at the E2 camp!

 

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Sep 13, 2013

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Decoding spoken words

Decoding spoken words using local field potentials recorded from the cortical surface

Communication in patients with “locked-in syndrome” is often an arduous task. Intuitive and rapid communication may be restored by directly interfacing with language areas of the cerebral cortex. We used a grid of closely spaced, nonpenetrating micro-electrodes to record local field potentials (LFPs) from the surface of face motor cortex and Wernicke’s area. From these LFPs we successfully classified a small set of words on a trial-by-trial basis at levels well above chance, demonstrating that this approach can be used to potentially restore communication to locked-in patients. Go to PubMed

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Sep 13, 2013

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Electrodes detect finger movement

Detection and classification of multiple finger movements using a chronically implanted Utah Electrode Array

This work demonstrates a decoding method that can detect and classify finger movements without any a priori knowledge of the data, task, or behavior, and lend further support that a chronically implanted Utah Electrode Array is suitable for both acquiring and decoding neuronal data. Go to PubMed

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Sep 13, 2013

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Detecting brain signals that control movement

A new University of Utah study shows that arrays of tiny electrodes placed between the skull and the brain can accurately detect brain signals that command arm movements. Read the full release at www.unews.utah.edu/p/?r=062409-1

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